FIghting Rule Changes In The NHL

I just finished reading an article on the SportingNews website called “NHL fighting debate has some new heavyweights”.  This article was written shortly after the incident between Colton Orr (Toronto) and George Parros (Montreal).  After a shocking “mishap” to Parros after a fight, there has been much discussion about the penalty of fighting and even if fighting should be kept in the game ?!  Now, I completely understand the responses many of these players have been giving on what the penalty should be of fighting.   If rules have changed based on head shot penalties, why don’t the rules change from a full out fist fight with multiple blows to the head ?  Steve Yzerman responds to the issue at hand by saying, “I believe a player should get a game misconduct for fighting” … “We penalize and suspend players for making contact with the head while checking in an effort to reduce head injuries yet we still allow fighting.  We’re stuck in the middle and need to decide what kind of sport do we want to be. Either anything goes and we accept the consequences or take the next step and eliminate fighting.”  (Gentille, 2013).  This is definitely a big decision that the NHL has to make.  If fighting was eliminated from the game of hockey, imagine how much the game itself would be changed ?  What would be the use of getting players that are being played just to aggravate and fight a similar character on the opposing team ?  The game speed would increase, the quality of play would be focused towards creativity and finesse (much like the European style of play, even though fighting is still in play in that league).

My question is this… What are your thoughts on this situation?  Would it be a good thing if fighting was eliminated from the game of hockey ?  Do you think fighting is one of the aspects of the game that draws crowds ?

Let me know your thoughts !

Article Link…

Gentille, S. (2013, October 2). Nhl fighting debate has some new heavyweights. SportingNews NHL. Retrieved from http://www.sportingnews.com/nhl/story/2013-10-02/nhl-fighting-rules-debate-george-parros-face-steve-yzerman

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to FIghting Rule Changes In The NHL

  1. chase6464 says:

    This is, and has been a touchy subject for a few years now and with the increasing amount of injuries too players with regards to concussions, broken jaws, knuckles, etc, it seems as though the league is slowly implementing the elimination of fighting. Player safety is front and center with regards to policies and rule procedures in the NHL and is increasingly becoming the talk of the league as more players are falling to injuries from fighting incidents. Fighting in hockey clearly offers benefits too fans and potential team revenues that other professional sports may not, however there comes a point in time when it may be deemed as more of a risk to health and safety of players (which are organization assets), than a reward too the fans excitement and toughness of the team. I remember hearing one of the Panelists P.J Stock saying “without fighting, we will see comparisons to college hockey where players are taking more runs at superstars and being more aggressive with their stick because there is no fighting element to maintain the aggression from the opposing team.” I personally love fighting in the NHL and agree it is one of the most exciting aspects of the game but with the implementation of the visor rule as well as the extra 2 minutes for taking helmets off, I feel it is the NHL’s way of slowly moving toward the elimination of fighting completely. Good read, should be an interesting topic throughout the entire season.

    Marked – SE

  2. mmorello11 says:

    So I know this topic is pretty touchy but I have always been a firm believer that fighting shouldn’t be completely eliminated from the game of hockey. I know that it is a huge draw for many people—myself included. Watching the season opener with a bunch of friends I couldn’t tell you how many times I heard, “Orr better fight” or “ Come on let’s see a good fight”. People enjoy this aspect of the game, yeah it can be dangerous and incidents can happen unfortunately but I think eliminating it completely would be silly.
    If hockey is completely removed from the game what are the enforcers supposed to do? Fighting is a huge part of their role, now they will probably not get as much playing time, no? Also, players may start to get a little chippy with the all-stars of the team because of the threat of the enforcer doing something is no longer vivid.

    Marked – SE

  3. wilsonjulia says:

    I believe that the league has to look a fighting in two different mindsets. First, they must analyze the safety of fighting and the number of concussions and head blows that are resulting from fighting. They must decide when enough is enough and they may not fully have the issue of fighting in hockey on the “agenda” until someone actually dies from a fight and they can not keep putting the facts of the health concerns off anymore. Second, I think they league has to consider the issue of fighting from a business standpoint. Many fans watch hockey in order to see fights. I think the league has not implemented any strong policies against fighting yet because fighting draws in viewers, which in turn makes revenue. I guess the real question is does the league places health and safety above revenues or vice versa?

    Marked – SE

  4. pauldermody says:

    If the NHL were to take fighting out of hockey I would probably stop watching the game. The reason hockey is so interesting (playing or watching) is because the fights. It is engrained within the sport much like the ice we play on. Yes it has become very dangerous and sometimes downright just wrong, but it is an important part of the game. It was mentioned in one of the above comments that without fighting the NHL would be very comparable towards the NCAA or CIS style of hockey. This is true. We saw what happened when we tried to speed the game up, we saw more head injuries and more injuries throughout the game. Fighting does something very important. 1, it defuses situations within the game so star athletes aren’t being “run” at, and 2, IT PUTS BUTTS IN THE SEATS. So what?, it is dangerous and makes hockey players look like barbarians. Well to answer that we are barbarians, sport is an animalistic event and it is important for the game of hockey to keep because it plays a certain purpose. The comparable would be taking hitting out of football, and that would be a terrible mistake.

    Marked – SE

  5. mb11oo says:

    I find it more than a little ironic that Steve Yzerman is calling for an end of fighting in the game while throughout his whole career, he was flanked by one of the best (if not THE best) fighters the game has ever seen, enabling him to put up Hall of Fame numbers and make millions of dollars . Don’t recall him saying too much back then. The fact of the matter is hockey is the only contact sport where its athletes carry potentially deadly weapons in their hands (stick) and play at extremely high rate of speed where split second decisions are made in a split second. This is a recipe for disaster. The NCAA has a rule against fighting, which, along with full face shields has set ideal conditions for some of the worst stick work found anywhere. This doesn’t even address the business considerations for the NHL. Fighting is essential in attracting new American fans as they are drawn to the violent nature of the game. When polled, even the players themselves endorsed that part of the game. Now increasing the penalty or eliminating the “staged” fights should maybe be looked into but banning it altogether is a bit heavy-handed in my opinion.

    Marked – SE

  6. cg10lh says:

    As an avid hockey fan, in my opinion fighting serves a purpose in the game. WIth the implementation of the instigator rule we have seen the rise of the ‘rat’ role on teams (i.e Kaleta, Lapierre, Cooke). These players make living off questionable hits, slashes, and general misconduct toward the oppositions star players. Because of the instigator rule these players no longer have to answer to certain players who would not so subtly ensure that these illegal hits do not injure star players. The instigator rule makes it so it is not the ‘rat’ in question that answers the bell after a questionable play, but one of his more equipped teammates. In my opinion this results in more ‘staged fighting’ which many complain about, and more injuries to star players. Though it may be an unpopular opinion, the best way to police the game of hockey is to have the players police it themselves and keep each other within the lines.

    Marked – SE

  7. wesdimascio says:

    I personally believe you cannot take fighting out of hockey. There are, however, ways to eliminate the amount of fighting that takes place. Staged fighting, for example, has no place in the game because it’s usually between two guys that have very little hockey skill. You don’t see two guys in the NFL stop the game to fight because it’s “their job”. Guys like Colten Orr and George Parros are in the NHL because they are known as heavyweights – not because they have superior talent like Sidney Crosby or Alex Ovechkin. I believe that if you take “goons” out of hockey, it allows more skilled players to play, which will also make the game more exciting from a talent perspective. If two guys go at it because they’re in the heat of the moment, then it’s hard to control it – it’s human nature. As for health concerns, there’s always going to be an issue with that. Hockey’s a sport: if you’re afraid of getting hurt, don’t play. The league takes necessary precautions by making it mandatory that players wear proper equipment. What else do you want them to do? Wear bubble wrap? Overall, fighting in hockey will have a place in the game as long as people play it. I think it can be limited, but never taken out completely.

    Marked – SE

  8. jpecchia92 says:

    Great blog post and topic! Everyone has made some valid points as to the issue of fighting in hockey. Just recently a player in the USHL fell and hit his head due to fighting and went into convulsions shortly after, a scary sight when I watched it on TSN… Although, one thing I notice with the injuries from fighting is that a lot of the time the players helmets come off. Now, thinking outside the box a little, the chin straps on a helmet are there to keep the helmet ON! If you look at players in the NHL majority of them leave their chin straps so loose that they might as well not even wear a helmet because a tiny bump and the helmet goes flying off. I know in cycling the proper fit for a helmet with regards to the chin strap is that you should’t be able to fit more then two fingers from your chin to the strap. In minor hockey kids get a penalty for not wearing mouth guards when on the ice, so why can’t NHL players get a penalty for not wearing helmets the way they are meant to be worn? What is going to prevent more injuries having a helmet on tight or penalizing players for having their jersey tucked in? I think the NHL needs to think outside the box a little to find ways to keep fighting in the game but keep players safe. At the end of the day these are grown men who understand their is a danger in the game and they consent to it when they enter a fight.

    Marked – SE

  9. cgates14 says:

    **REPOSTED UNDER CORRECT USERNAME**
    As an avid hockey fan, in my opinion fighting serves a purpose in the game. WIth the implementation of the instigator rule we have seen the rise of the ‘rat’ role on teams (i.e Kaleta, Lapierre, Cooke). These players make living off questionable hits, slashes, and general misconduct toward the oppositions star players. Because of the instigator rule these players no longer have to answer to certain players who would not so subtly ensure that these illegal hits do not injure star players. The instigator rule makes it so it is not the ‘rat’ in question that answers the bell after a questionable play, but one of his more equipped teammates. In my opinion this results in more ‘staged fighting’ which many complain about, and more injuries to star players. Though it may be an unpopular opinion, the best way to police the game of hockey is to have the players police it themselves and keep each other within the lines.

    Marked – SE

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s